Patagonia Down With It Parka

Price: $299
Fill: 8.1 oz. of 700-fill down
Weight: 1 lb. 15 oz.
What we like: Patagonia's typical performance and quality in a warm, stylish, winter-ready parka.
What we don’t: Not as weather-resistant as we'd like.
See the Patagonia Down With It Parka

4.6

Patagonia’s high-performance and responsibly produced outerwear is known both for excellent protection from the elements and looking good in the process. Their casual Down With It Parka follows suit, bringing Patagonia design to a daily winter jacket. We wore the Down With It Parka during a particularly snowy and cold winter in Bend, Oregon, and came away impressed with its sleek lines, impressive insulating abilities, and unparalleled quality and durability. Below, we provide details on the Down With It’s warmth, weather protection, features, construction and durability, fit and sizing, and more. To see how it stacks up, see our article on the best winter jackets.
 

Performance

Warmth

Patagonia’s Down With It is an extremely warm parka that can handle the depths of winter in the some of the coldest climates. First, you get 700-fill-power down, which provides excellent loft and warmth for the weight (among our top picks, only the $649 Arc’teryx Patera Parka uses higher-quality 750-fill-power down). Second, the Down With It Parka is stuffed with 8.1 ounces of down, also known as the fill weight. Few manufacturers in the winter parka category provide fill weight, which makes apples-to-apples comparisons difficult. But in practice, we can say that the Patagonia is slightly warmer than Marmot’s popular Montreal and notably warmer than The North Face’s Metropolis Parka. If you run cold or plan on spending time in frigid winter climates, the Down With It should be up to the task. Patagonia Down With It Parka (patio)

The length of your winter parka is another key factor in evaluating warmth, and coverage around the midsection and upper legs can vary significantly between models. For example, measuring down the center back, Marmot’s Montreal is just 33 inches in length, whereas the Down With It Parka is a notable 5 inches longer at 38 inches, extending to the knees as opposed to the Montreal’s thigh-length fit. There are pros and cons here: the Montreal is better for movement with less jacket getting in the way of walking and other activities, but the Patagonia undoubtedly wins out in the warmth department. It provides far more coverage when sitting down, bending over, or standing for extended periods of time. It is worth noting that Patagonia makes a shorter jacket version of the Down With It that extends just 30 inches down the center of the back and has more of a hip-length cut.

Last but not least, Patagonia included a few nice features that help boost the warmth factor. The generous hood cinches tightly around the head to seal out the cold, a fleece-lined collar provides next-to-skin comfort and added coziness, and a mostly seamless liner provides a solid layer of reinforcement behind the external baffles, preventing wind from getting past the external stitching. In addition, the front two-way zipper is covered with a protective flap, keeping warm air in and cold air out (the Marmot Montreal lacks this heat-trapping feature). If you’re looking to seal out the elements, The Down With It Parka does a darn good job at it.Patagonia Down With It Parka (front zip 2)


Water and Wind Protection 

The Patagonia Down With It Parka offers great protection in snowy and windy conditions: think winter in places like Minneapolis or Chicago. Down is a great insulator and can serve as an excellent wind barrier, but a few features allow the Down With It to resist wind better than comparable baffled jackets. As mentioned above, the interior provides an extra layer of protection against wind and escaping heat, and a flap covers the front zip and keeps gusts from entering. These features provide a bump in wind protection from jackets like the Marmot Montreal (which does not have a covered zipper) and The North Face’s Metropolis (which lacks both a front flap and an interior lining). Patagonia Down With It Parka (hood 3)

In terms of wet-weather protection, the Down With It’s 100-percent recycled polyester shell is coated in a durable water repellent (DWR) finish, keeping light moisture from penetrating the jacket. In our testing, water beaded on the external fabric and quickly rolled off, leaving no trace of wetness. Keep in mind that the DWR finish was fresh on our new jacket and will wear away over time (but can always be refreshed with a machine washing or reapplication). Furthermore, it’s important to remember that a DWR finish does not mean a jacket is waterproof; rather, it implies that a jacket can resist moisture for short periods of time. Think puddle splashes, light rain showers, or sustained contact with dry snow. In addition, the Down With It does not feature hydrophobic down, meaning that if water gets past the outer shell, the down will get wet, losing its loft and insulating abilities. With hydrophobic down, the Marmot Montreal is a better choice for wet climates—but still pales in comparison to the wet-weather performance of jackets with waterproof membranes such as the Arc’teryx Patera or The North Face Arctic Parka.Patagonia Down With It Parka (waterproofing)


Features

Hood

The Patagonia Down With It Parka features a down-insulated hood with simple and glove-friendly adjustments along the sides that allow you to cinch it close to your face during particularly cold or gusty weather. Most comparable parkas have a removable hood, and Patagonia follows suit with a hood that attaches via a series of simple snaps. We generally prefer a zipper attachment over snaps—it's simpler to attach and remove, and does not leave gaps for cold air to enter. Patagonia addresses the latter issue with a narrow internal flap that functions both to keep cold air from entering through the gaps between the snaps and to cover the snaps when the hood is removed. Furthermore, a fleece-lined collar adds next-to-skin comfort and warmth, regardless of whether or not you have the hood attached.Patagonia Down With It Parka (hood adjustment)


Cuffs

Patagonia keeps it simple with the cuffs on the Down With It, opting for tapered arms and down baffles that extend all the way past the wrists. While streamlined and visually pleasing, we find that these cuffs lack the heat-trapping and weather protection we like from our winter jacket. They’ll do the trick when paired with gloves that extend past the wrist, but for truly cold weather, we prefer internal gaskets (such as those found on the Marmot Montreal or The North Face’s Arctic) or Velcro straps along the cuffs that keep out snow and cold air.Patagonia Down With It Parka (cuff)


Pockets

The Down With It features two generously sized handwarmer pockets that are both insulated and lined with fleece for added comfort. These zippered pockets are welted for extra style points and come with relatively long zipper pulls for glove-friendly access (a hole at the end of the zipper pull also allows you to attach a longer piece of cord for even more convenience when wearing thick winter gloves). The parka also features a large internal zippered chest pocket for keeping valuables safe and warm, which we appreciate. Patagonia Down With It Parka (chest pocket)


Length

The Down With It is a knee-length parka that measures 38 inches down the center back panel. Held up against comparable models, the Patagonia’s length is on the longer side. The North Face’s Arctic and Metropolis parkas are 37.5 and 38 inches respectively (although the Metropolis seems longer than its measurement would suggest), and the Arc’teryx Patera Parka comes in at 36.75 inches. On the other hand, Marmot’s thigh-length Montreal is a notable 5 inches shorter than the Patagonia at 33 inches total. With more length you get more insulation over the legs and more coverage when bending over or sitting down, which means more warmth overall. However, you do sacrifice some freedom of movement when opting for a longer jacket. All in all, it’s a matter of personal preference, although we do recommend longer jackets like the Down With It for truly cold weather.Patagonia Down With It Parka (hem)


Construction and Durability

Patagonia almost always impresses in terms of design and build quality, and their Down With It Parka is no exception. The jacket features robust zippers and a thick and durable face fabric, and the shell is showing no signs of wear after a winter of use. Compared to the 1.8 ounce-per-yard fabric of the Marmot Montreal, the Down With It features a 2.3-ounce shell that is noticeably thicker and more durable. Furthermore, the stitching is immaculate with no escaping feathers, and features like the welded pockets and princess seams give the jacket an extra dose of style and shaping. And to top it all off, both the down fill and polyester shell are made with recycled materials—one more way that Patagonia leads the industry in sustainability and environmental consciousness.Patagonia Down With It Parka (window shopping 2)


Weight and Packability 

For a jacket that’s meant to be used in town, weight and packability might not be your biggest concern. However, whether you’re taking a trip to a colder climate or packing winter clothes away for the summer, the ability to compress your jacket certainly doesn't hurt. The Down With It is impressive in this respect: it can pack down to about the size of a basketball, and at 1 pound 14.8 ounces, is extremely lightweight for the warmth and coverage it provides. You’ll find many other winter jackets to be bulkier and more difficult to transport (The North Face’s Arctic Parka and Arc’teryx’s Patera Parka being prime examples). Furthermore, the Down With It’s low weight makes it feel cozy and flowy, unlike the weightiness of the Arctic, a jacket that’s actually made our shoulders sore after a few hours of use. And impressively, the Patagonia is a warmer jacket than the 2-pound-2.2-ounce Marmot Montreal.Patagonia Down With It Parka (no hood)


Fit and Sizing

The Patagonia Down With It is a knee-length parka available in a range of sizes from XS to XL. Princess seams give it a form-fitting and flattering shape. I typically wear a size small in all things Patagonia and the Down With It fits the bill. That said, the parka is more trim-fitting than Patagonia’s more performance-oriented jackets and permits less freedom of movement in the arms and shoulders than I am used to. If you plan on wearing a midlayer or bulky sweater underneath, you may want to size up.Patagonia Down With It Parka (zipper flap)


What We Like

  • A super warm and comfortable winter parka that looks great.
  • Features Patagonia’s high-quality design and construction. 
  • Durable 2.3-ounce face fabric is more tea- resistant and robust than similar baffled down parkas. 
  • The 38-inch center back measurement provides knee-length coverage, which is great for staying warm whether walking or sitting.
  • Cuts down on waste with 100-percent recycled down and polyester.
     

What We Don’t

  • The cuffs lack gaskets or adjustments, meaning cold air and moisture can easily enter at the wrists.
  • Not as water-resistant as a jacket with a waterproof membrane or hydrophobic down.
  • The snaps on the hood attachment and zipper flap can be difficult to use, especially with gloves on.

Patagonia Down With It Parka (backside)


Comparison Table

Jacket Price Fill Length Weight Waterproof
Patagonia Down With It Parka $299 700-fill down 38 in. 1 lb. 15 oz. No
Marmot Montreal Down Coat $285 700-fill down 33 in. 2 lbs. 2.2 oz. No
Patagonia Tres 3-in-1 Down Parka $599 700-fill down 35.5 in. 3 lbs. 2.9 oz. Yes
The North Face Arctic Parka II $299 550-fill down 37.75 in. 2 lbs. 14 oz. Yes
Arc'teryx Patera Parka $649 750-fill down/synthetic 36.75 in. 2 lbs. 2.7 oz. Yes


The Competition

If you’re on the hunt for a casual winter jacket, there are a number of high-quality options. The Marmot Montreal is another great choice that's similar to the Down With It in design, but with a few features that set it apart. For one, it contains hydrophobic down (also 700-fill), which lends an extra layer of security for when you do get caught in wet snow or rain. Second, the Marmot is a whole 5 inches shorter than the Patagonia (classified as thigh-length rather than knee-length), which gives it more freedom of movement but less warmth and coverage overall. Third, it comes with a fur-brimmed hood for added style points and a fleece-lined interior for extra coziness. But with no flap covering the front zipper, noticeably less warmth during our testing, and thinner, less durable face fabric and zippers, it’s less of a performance piece than the Patagonia. For most weather that you’ll encounter in town, it’s a toss-up. But for just $14 more, we give the edge to the Down With It for its impressively durable build and extra warmth-related features. Patagonia Down With It Parka (window shopping)

For climates where wet winter weather can be an issue (we’re looking at you, Seattle), you’ll likely want an insulated jacket with a waterproof membrane, and Patagonia’s Tres 3-in-1 Parka is a great place to start. At $599, it’s twice the price of the Down With It, but you get twice the jacket: a waterproof shell and a removable 700-fill down liner that can be paired or worn separately. If you don’t need the versatility of a 3-in-1 jacket, The North Face’s waterproof Arctic Parka II is a nice happy medium for the same price as the Down With It. With 550-fill power down, it doesn’t provide the same level of insulation as the Patagonia, but gasket cuffs, a waterproof shell, and a fur-brimmed hood combine to make the Arctic a warm, weather-protective option. Last but not least, Arc'teryx's Patera Parka is a bomber winter jacket that uses premium 750-fill-power down and is fully waterproof, but it will cost you a whopping $649. 

Last but not least, Patagonia offers the Down With It in a shorter jacket version that runs 30 inches in length down the center back for more of a hip-length cut. The jacket is cheaper at $229 and lighter at 1 pound 10 ounces, but uses the same 700-fill down and durable face fabric. Most people will prefer the longer parka version for its extra coverage and added warmth during the depths of winter, but the jacket is nice option for more moderate climates and the shoulder seasons.

Editor’s note: We usually provide a live price comparison table below our outdoor gear reviews, but the Down With It Parka is currently out of stock at most major outdoor retailers. Patagonia will be bringing it back for winter 2019, and we'll update this page when they do.

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